3 health myths

3 Health Myths That May Be Keeping You From Healthy Food

Are you avoiding healthy foods because of unhealthy myths? If so, you’re not alone. Many of us have become alarmed about unhealthy fats, sugar, and environmental toxins.

The problem comes when we overreact. We go to the extreme, trying to eliminate fats, sugar, and natural food, like fish, that is vulnerable to pollution. Unfortunately, by overreacting, we lose many health benefits.

A better alternative is to know the health benefits of foods, discover the best sources, and choose wisely.

Let’s look at three health myths related to food, and find out why these myths don’t stand up to healthy choices.

Myth #1: Fatty food is unhealthy

Did you know?

Not all fats are created equal.

It’s true that …

healthy fatsUnhealthy fats are not good. If you eat French fries at every meal, you are challenging your body to absorb a once natural potato that has been stripped of the vitamins in its skin, chemically altered at a scorching temperature, and drenched in unhealthy fat.

But …

Your body needs natural sources of healthy fats to function. Healthy fats protect your cells, store energy, and help with nerve and hormone function, along with vitamin absorption. Even your brain is composed of necessary fat. Eliminating fat from your diet won’t work.

A myth-busting alternative

Know the difference between healthy and unhealthy fats. Choose the best, natural sources of good fats, including plants. Learn the kinds of healthy fats, how they work in your body, and how much you need. Be sensible.

Myth #2: Sugary food is unhealthy

Did you know?

Your brain needs glucose to function.

It’s true that …

Too much of the wrong kinds of sugar can throw your endocrine system off balance. Where blood sugar imbalances have already set in, care must be taken under a doctor’s guidance, even with eating fruit.

But …

For a healthy individual with no blood sugar concerns, your body needs some naturally occurring healthy sugars. Whole fruit can be a healthy and much needed source of brain fuel. Why whole fruit? Because the natural sugars in whole fruit are balanced with fiber. This helps with healthy sugar absorption. By eating whole fruit, you consume naturally occurring sugar the way nature intended.

A myth-busting alternative

Take time to understand how the sugar you consume is converted to glucose and used by your body. Learn the differences between healthy and unhealthy sugar intake. Eat healthy whole foods in balance, so natural sugar can be absorbed slowly, in the ways your body is designed to process it. Learn to identify glucose levels in different foods. If your blood sugar balance is normal, enjoy a sensible and healthy amount of good whole fruit.

Myth #3: Fresh-caught fish is unhealthy

salmon is healthy food

Did you know?

If you avoid all foods exposed to environmental toxins, you would starve?

It’s true that …

Our oceans are polluted. Fish can be exposed to toxic levels of mercury. Closer to home, even the best-protected fresh produce, grown in the best organic gardens cannot escape our polluted environment. And fish are higher up the food chain, which means they have already eaten smaller sea life that might have been exposed to pollutants in the water.

But …

Fish are an amazing source of healthy fatty acids and Vitamin D. Fish can be one of the heart-healthiest meat sources of protein. The sea life consumed by fish contains unique combinations of nutrients, adding healthy variety to a land-based diet. Variety and moderation in your diet are keys to a healthy body.

A myth-busting alternative

Rather than eliminate such a healthy food, arm yourself with knowledge. Know which fish are the healthiest. Fish that swim in cold, deep waters, protected with layers of fat have less exposure to toxins. Find a good source of wild-caught fish and ask questions. Learn exactly what takes place, from the time your fish is caught to the time it reaches your dinner table. Prepare fish in the healthiest ways.

The key to healthy eating is to know more about the foods you eat, where they come from, and how they affect your body. Ask questions. Learn. Use wisdom. Make healthy choices. And enjoy a variety of the wonderful foods nature provides.